Wednesday, October 06, 2010

It Doesn't Have a Coffee Cup Holder

I'm up to my old tricks: sticking my head and camera in every cockpit I'm allowed to, and serving them up for you to analyze.

What aircraft is this, and if that's too easy, guess what they were eating for inflight snacks. As usual, if you know for sure, don't spoil the fun of those working on figuring it out, but feel free to comment on how annoying it is to try to fly IFR with an attitude indicator like the one on the right. Once again, if you know the answer, please abstain from posting it. If you don't know for sure and want to guess, don't read the comments until you have made your guess, because typically some readers disregard this request and jump to reveal the answer.

39 comments:

Grant said...

The strange airspeed indicator says it goes "jet" speeds. And the technology of the warning lights, flight instruments etc,. suggests 1960s technology. I have a guess, but I'll hold off and see what others come up with for snacks... that's got me baffled.

Chris said...

Hmm. It does appear to be a Korean or Vietnam war era fighter panel. Maybe an F-4 Phantom or the like. I also presume snacks would be from a C-Ration. But the Lucky Strikes are not authorized in flight.

dph said...

Wondering if it was a flying example or a museum piece?

If it was flying, my guess would be that there are multiple of them in active service still..

Anoynmous said...

That thing on the top left looks suspiciously like a 23-channel CB radio.

Anonymous said...

definitely military... definitely a fighter. Northrop F-5?

Anonymous said...

@ anonymous 01:54: Does the F5 have side-by-side seating or front and back?

TgardnerH said...

I remember reading somewhere that russian airplanes have (had?) "weird" artificial horizons, where the horizon stays put (relative to the airframe) and the little airplane moves, rather than the other way around. It looks like this might be what is in the right hand picture... but then again, I could just be making stuff up.

A Squared said...

Generally, one would expect a Russian aircraft to have Russian words in Cyrillic letters, or at least all the Russian aircraft I've been in did. YMMV

A Squared said...

Neither the F-5 nor the F-5, nor any other fighter I csn think of had side by side seating, with the possible exception of the F-111, which really isn't a fighter.

A Squared said...

Should read "neither the F-4, nor the F-5"

SkinnyDennis said...

Looks like someone was slopping a cherry coke around the cockpit.

A6 Intruder?

jwenting said...

side by side seating arrangement, mach meter, 1960s technology, no visible weapons related systems.

Makes me think of a T-37 Tweet.

Anonymous said...

The in-flight snack would probably be a goose during a white Christmas.

coreydotcom said...

i know nothing about these things but i would like to guess too...

my guess is a C172. snacks = buggles... coz i love buggles.

thanks for letting me play!

Anonymous said...

Master Caution/Master Warning says Military. Instrumentation says 1950's or 1960's.

I'd rule out both the F4 and the F5 because of the Mach meter. It only goes to M1.5, F5's couldn't get anywhere near that fast, and F4's could and did occaisonally reach Mach 2.

I suspect Century series fighters, but M1.5 is too fast for an F100, or F102. So that leaves the F101 (Voodo), F104 (Delta Dagger?) and F106 (Thunderchief).

Andy said...

I was both able to figure this out without Google, and *readily* confirm my guess using Google.

I used three key pieces of information that are in the pictures, and then the first image that came up when I searched "****** cockpit" in Google images was astonishingly clear.

D.B. said...

Military, yes. Aerobatic? Yes. 1950-1970? Jet? likely. Canadian? Probably. Side by side seats? Seems like.

I'm going to guess DH Jet Provost, a British jet trainer that may well have been used by the RCAF. I know you can get one for around US $20-30k, and I have seen a couple in the USA. I'm guessing they will be more common North of the border.

A Squared said...

I suspect Century series fighters,


so which of the Century series fighters had side by side seating?

etully said...

I've got the plane figured out, but the snack? I'm guessing cheetos! There seems to be cheeto residue on the guages.

A Squared said...

A-6 intruder didn't have two pilots, the guy on the right was a Bombardier-Navigator and he didn't have flight instruments on his side, mostly a radar display

A Squared said...

Also, the analysis of the Mach meter range neglects to factor in that the barber pole on the airspeed indicator is right around 410 knots.

Andy said...

Asquared said: "Also, the analysis of the Mach meter range neglects to factor in that the barber pole on the airspeed indicator is right around 410 knots."

So... a side-by-side jet, with dual controls, capable of going over Mach 1 but limited to around 410 kias.

That's the question that led me to my answer: What side-by-side military jet (that our Canadian blogess might run in to) would intentionally be limited to that speed?

Grant said...

(Red Herring?) ... The photo was either taken on a windy day while a gust of wind was making the VSI read minus 300 fpm... or the system needs attention. What else could cause both VSIs to read off-zero on the ground?

Aviatrix said...

etully: Canadians eat Cheezies, not Cheetos. I don't believe there any clues in the picture to indicate the snack, but it is guessable. You and coreydotcom should have another go.

etully said...

As corny a guess as this may be, I say the inflight snack is none other than oxygen!

Dan in ALB said...

I am not a pilot, but a clue for me is the fact that there is a gear alarm override button. Is this common in all aircraft with retactable gear? I think that the pilots of this aircraft may find a need for this button.

Ward said...

D.B.'s thought process helped me get it, and like Andy, googling for "***** cockpit" got me a picture of #10 to confirm it.

Still no idea what they were eating, unless it's something typically Canadian like Kraft Dinner or Tim Horton's.

A Squared said...

So... a side-by-side jet, with dual controls, capable of going over Mach 1 but limited to around 410 kias.


I think that too much is being made of the mach meter's range. just because an instrument is installed with a certain upper value doesn't mean that the aircraft is capable of achieving that particular value. The altimeter installed in my C-180 will display altitudes to 100,000 feet. Doesn't mean it is capable of climbing that high.

The manufacturer wished to have mach number displayed. The meter they installed has a scale that goes to 1.5 Mach.

A Squared said...

Gear warning override buttons are common. I wouldn't draw any inferences from that.

WILLO2D said...

Hi Aviatrix,

My suggestion seems to have disappeared! But I'm not going to re-submit.

D.B. de Havilland Jet Provost? I don't think so. Hunting for the original JP3's and 4's; BAC for the T5 and T5A. I worked on the T5A at RAF College Cranwell for 4 years. Got something like 37 hours. The JP never had an instrument panel like that depicted in Aviatrix's pics.

Kind regards... again,

IanH

WILLO2D said...

P.S. No idea on the Canadian in-flight rat packs. For JP trips over an hour I usually took along a couple of Kit-Kats or Mars bars - one for me, one for the QFI!

coreydotcom said...

pita chips and hummus?

Aviatrix said...

pita chips and hummus?
Are you saying they were white people?

dph said...

I liked the christmas goose comment, that poster is on the same vein as me I think for type.

I neglected my food guess.

Robins Eggs (The equivalent of timbits from the "other" donut shop)

TgardnerH said...

I neglected my food guess, but if its eastern european like i thought, perogies would be fitting, since they seem to keep coming up in other posts

Anonymous said...

I have the airplane figured, but any insight on the snacks would just be a WAG. 8-)

-Roger

Aviatrix said...

A WAG is the only way you're going to get the snack. But it isn't something completely off the wall, like sardines or pirogies. (Spellchecker likes pirogi but not pirogies. Tough, spellchecker, if a word is imported into English it's going to have to accept English declensions).

Devil In The Drain said...

Folks, the key fact is that Aviatrix KNOWS what the snack was. Which means either she was there, or the snack was famous.

Which gives us the answer. That's the cockpit of Canada's first (and only) flight to low-Earth orbit. The crew famously (famously within Canada Air and Space Administration) ate pierogie *filling*, from squeeze tubes.

I bet this is how the aquatic space aliens first came into the picture. . . .

Michael5000 said...

[[juvenile "fast gyro erect" button bon mot here]]